Anagnorisis Fine Arts


Anagnorisis Picks | New York March by Binnorie

March is always a clusterfuck of a month for the arts in New York.  There will be a myriad of art fairs in action and since they’ve gained in popularity, this year is likely going to be larger than last.  It’s really one of the best times for collectors to converge into this world art capital, New York City, to buy and peruse new art.  Networking opportunities abound as well, so it’s not just art that visitors will be shopping for.

The majority of the New York art fair week will get into full swing on March 8th with Volta, ScopeFountain, Pool and likely ten or twenty million others.  VergeArmory and Pulse will thankfully be opening a week earlier than most of the other fairs (really glad they’re doing this – there’s only so much art that can be taken in during one weekend). Scroll all the way to the bottom of this post for a short-list of where you might want to focus your attention at the art fairs.

To boot, many galleries are pulling out their biggest and baddest.  Odd Nerdrum has a solo exhibition opening at ForumAlex Gross and Victor Castillo will both be at Jonathan Levine, Kris Kuksi will have a new solo at Joshua Liner and that doesn’t even begin to list what is about to open in New York.

I’m also excited about some exhibitions that will be opening up outside of Gotham.  Those I’ll list in another post. Prepare your attention spans, people! Here we go:

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Click on subheaders below to get details on each exhibit below:

Sloan Fine Arts at Scope

"Absinthe" by Ransom and Mitchell

Alix Sloan is taking a group of artists to Scope this year.  Artists Mia Brownell, Elizabeth McGrath, Charles Moody, Jonathan Viner and Brad Woodfin will all be included not to mention the photography of Stacey Ransom and Jason Mitchell (pictured above).  Quite a wonderful collection of artists there – her booth will stand out for sure!

Check out her blog for more information.

Odd Nerdrum at Forum Gallery

"Egg Snatchers"

Odd Nerdrum will have a solo exhibition at his New York gallery regardless of the pressure and stress that Norway’s tax evasion charges have likely caused him.  Read more on that from Leo Plaw on Fantastic Visions.  Nerdrum’s exhibition opens at Forum Gallery on March 8th, and will be on view until May 10th.  The gallery will also be present at the Armory show and will likely have a work or two of his to see there as well.

Alex Gross’s Product Placement & Victor Castillo’s The Jungle at Jonathan Levine

"Funny Little Man" by Victor Castillo

"Volcom" by Alex Gross

These two solo exhibitions opened last Saturday night at Jonathan Levine Gallery and will be open for the rest of the month.  Quite a surrealistic feast for the eyes, here!

Kris Kuksi’s Triumph at Joshua Liner Gallery

"Hercules vs. Diana" by Kris Kuksi

Kris Kuksi never fails to please his fans and collectors with his solo exhibitions at Liner. I highly suggest going during a quiet time rather than attending the crowded opening party. The extra elbow room will better allow you to spend a lot of time looking at each work including looking under each sculpture – Kris often hides things where you might not think to look. Ask the gallery attendant to guide you on that. Triumph opens on March 8 15th and is on view until April 7, 2012. [edit: the date for this opening changed on Liner’s website after I published my list, here. The show is opening on the 15th, not the 8th]

George Boorujy’s Blood Memory at P.P.O.W.

"Initiate" by George Boorujy

"Initiate" by George Boorujy

This exhibition at P.P.O.W looks quite promising. Stark, minimalist and clean, George Boorujy’s depictions of animals are uncomfortable in their placement, yet beautifully rendered. This exhibition opens on March 15 and will be on view through to April 14, 2012

Cindy Sherman Retrospective at the MoMA

"Untitled 466" by Cindy Sherman

You have until June 11 to see the Cindy Sherman retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. This exhibition includes 170 photographs, tracing the artist’s career from the mid 1970s to the present.

The exhibition will explore dominant themes throughout Sherman’s career, including artifice and fiction; cinema and performance; horror and the grotesque; myth, carnival, and fairy tale; and gender and class identity. Also included are Sherman’s recent photographic murals (2010), which will have their American premiere at MoMA.

For a review of the show, check out this article about the exhibition on ArtInfo.

Jenny Morgan at Like the Spice’s Arts Not Fair

Image still from Jenny Morgan's "Passage" video

Like the Spice has decided to rebelliously have its own art fair out in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, which will be showcasing a number of their artists. Sounds like they’re having fun with this exhibition offering an alternative to the overwhelming art fair crowd:

This year, thousands of people will be hitting the art fairs. What do you do at art fairs? Try to steal a pass, struggle to find the lounge, squeeze into the V.I.P. room and maybe, maybe manage to find a couple pieces of art that don’t make you want to roll your eyes. And then it’s off to the after-party for handshakes and fun and it’s all forgotten until Miami. Doesn’t it leave you wanting something a little more intimate? Something different?

Like The Spice shows some good stuff, so whatever their reasoning is behind this show, it is sure to please.

David LaChapelle’s Earth Laughs in Flowers at Fred Torres Collaborations

"Wilting Gossip" by David LaChapelle

I’m not a huge fan of LaChapelle’s celebrity portraits, but I think that’s just because I’m not a fan of seeing celebrities in fine arts overall. A prejudice of mine? Perhaps. But this series of LaChapelle’s that has been making the rounds is quite beautiful and grotesque, using old master color and light to depict wilting flowers with modern day appendages such as cell phones, plastic bags, barbie dolls and cold french fries. I’ve seen many still lives like these accidentally set up in many homes. LaChapelle celebrates them in the most ironic of ways. This exhibit will be up at Fred Torres Collaborations through March 24th.

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What are you in for with the main art fairs? Well, to give you a general idea, last year Scope featured Frat-in-a-Box. This installation consisted of young college students, kept inside a clear box in the middle of the fair, given nothing but 30 cases of beer and a pee bucket. It was funny…I think. Frat-in-a-box (actually titled “Come On Guy”) seemed to get more press than much of the good art work in the fair (maybe the press considered the installation to have been good art work, but what do I know?).

That impression of the art fair world aside, there is impressive art to be seen – you just need to know where the good galleries and artists are located.

Besides what I already listed above, here are some focal points you might want to head towards:

Nicola Samori will be at Volta, which is a relatively small fair.
Along with Sloan Fine Art, Corey Helford Gallery will be at Scope.
Dacia Gallery will be showing Yuri Leonov at Fountain.
Verge hasn’t updated its site with its exhibitors a few days before the fair’s opening, so that’s a complete crapshoot.
At the Armory you’ll find Paul Kasmin Gallery which may have Walton Ford and Mark Ryden on view.

Hope this short list helps you navigate the coming maelstrom of art shows coming up this month. I’m sure there are more to find – please drop me a line if you think I missed something crucial. Happy hunting!

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Babble Report I by Binnorie

Do to take a peek at the most recent posts Anagnorisis’s Samantha Levin has up on the Beinart Surreal Art Collective and the Creep Machine:

Or, to satiate those with a lower attention span, please visit Samantha’s sublime Tumblr blog.

Beinart:
Martin Wittfooth’s Dark Water

Dark Water contains paintings from many artists whose work frequently explores these depths, curator included.  Remarkable about the dark nature of such art, is its quality for redemption, relief or realization.  Furthermore, each of these work’s unique elements of beauty can be simultaneously stunning and soothing, offering solace for the heavy subject matter they symbolize.

Read more…

Beinart:
The Indispensable Import of the Cute & Creepy

This exhibition of sweet and sticky macabre art represents curator Carrie Ann Baade‘s efforts to act as ambassador between the contemporary grotesque and the academic environment.

Read more…

Creep Machine:
Paul Komoda // The Thing Comes to Life

The artist talks a bit about his creature concepts for the movie and his experiences working on the movie.  Exclusive peeks at the monsters he designed for the film!

Read more…

Creep Machine:
Travis Louie’s Curious Pets

A mini sneak peek into Mr. Louie’s latest solo exhibition on the west coast.  Opening this weekend!

Read more…



That Which Remains by Binnorie

What remains after all decor is stripped down to our bare bones is what makes us who we are. What happens when we are forced to see this part of ourselves?

When diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease, artist Yuri Leonov became forced to see his young life from a new perspective, and to rely upon modern technology to keep his angry immune system at bay. Through his art, Yuri explores how he feels rooted, stuck and limited by those tools that are intended to help him, and what Remains of his self: past and future.  His explorations extend out to the world at large, how our own artificial advancements remove us from what is most important, and the paradox of how our efforts are quite possibly leading to our downfall.

Yuri pulls no punches. His work and the ideas behind it are wrought with emotion: questions about life and memories of the past. His work is introspective, offered to the world en masse as possible catharsis for all of us suffering from mortality. Yuri’s is a case of illness in youth, yet he is a very strong and determined individual; honestly he looks very healthy. His work is very well thought out, intelligently emotional and meaningful. His art is not his heart on his sleeve; it is an earnest search for relief.

Taught old master technique as a boy in Russia, he has some serious old master technique chops in his arsenal, yet he is not a realist. Much of his work is abstract and his paintings which incorporate realistic figures, interiors and landscapes are often created with non-traditional mediums including bugs and his own spit. “Though the work is figurative, the initial structure is an abstract framework of composition that allows the series to be interpreted as a unified body.” Additionally he adds meaning to his painting technique (the use of unmixed white paint, for example, is used on several works in this series as a connective visual element), and each series of paintings tell a story of growth, change or realization. There are very strong concepts underlying all of his works, some of which he describes openly and some of which he has chosen to keep private.

Remain is ethereal, ghostly and, at the same time, very human.  In my mind, the concepts behind the series connect to Parke-Harrison’s Counterpoint series, and the surrealistic story-lines and imagery of some of Adrei Tarkovsky’s films.  Additional man versus technology connections can be made to Masamune Shirow‘s Ghost in the Shell.  Remain is representational of a review of the past and an uncertain future filled with metaphor, private and shared.

A personal and philosophical description of his work:

Remain, which focuses on my own shortcomings and limitations is my most intimate and personal body of work to this day. The strange conviction of self-importance is present in everyone, all of whom will undoubtedly leave this realm of existence; and so all of us attempt the best we can to avoid the inevitable constraint of time by shifting the significance of existence to the things we attempt, or pretend to know. We ignore the larger, unknown to us, scheme of things in which our whole existence is just a miniscule fragment of the general process far beyond our control, instead focusing on trying to control what we think we can.

As such, control, time and scale are the major concepts I have explored in Remain. The act of making art is an excellent example in itself: convinced by a blind ambition that this determination will somehow hold back the weight of time, and prolong my existence even if in a non physical sense. After developing and now living with serious health problems, I have also developed a solid understanding and a persistent reminder that I will die, along with everyone. What will remain?

Remain will be on view at the White Rabbit’s White Box for only a short while longer.  Some works have sold and others are still available for collection.  To view them online and for further details about his exhibit, please visit the Remain gallery here.




A Bitter Message by Binnorie

Survival Research Laboratories‘s  A Bitter Message of Hopeless Grief from 1988.  Directed by J. Reiss.

A Bitter Message of Hopeless Grief is a dark film that follows anthropomorphized machine-beings made of metal, gears and bones through underground stone caves filled with heat and magenta.  They course slowly through dark fiery halls, interacting in morose ways, capturing and destroying lesser, more meek creatures.  To me the title of the work is over-dramatic, but the film itself has a mysterious and surreal quality to it that brings forth a grotesque beauty.  It’s depressing, yet powerful and emotional.  Should one pity these viscous creatures or hate them?

Survival Research Laboratories, founded by Mark Pauline in 1978, is more known for its live performances.  Machine-beings similar to those in the film are kinetic sculptures brought to life in thrilling displays of spitting fire, grinding motors and screeching metal all controlled by remote or driven by SRL members.  Each performance “consists of a unique set of ritualized interactions between machines, robots, and special effects devices, employed in developing themes of socio-political satire. Humans are present only as audience or operators.”  They are like crosses between MIT student robot competitions and the automobile accident reenactment scenes from Cronenberg’s movie Crash, all of them viewed in outdoor theaters by large audiences.

A Bitter Message of Hopeless Grief stands apart from Pauline’s live performances.  It captures a more sullen, almost pitiful aspect of the personalities of Pauline’s metallic creatures.  While they are wild things of strength and power, they are revealed as trapped and angry, lacking compassion and care.  Regardless, the film stays true to SRL’s focus of “re-directing the techniques, tools, and tenets of industry, science, and the military away from their typical manifestations in practicality, product or warfare.”

The film was directed by J. Reiss, also known for his work on Nine Inch Nails’ Happiness in Slavery music video.  Amongst many other projects, he has also directed music videos for The Black Crowes, Danzig, Slayer and the Kottonmouth Kings.  In 2007, he released his film, ‘Bomb It’, a documentary on grafitti and the perception of public space, featuring artists including Taki 183, Shepard Fairey, Os Gemeos and Revok.

To see more, Survival Research Laboratories currently have a ton of their performances posted up on their YouTube page online.



A Pupal Stage of Sorts by Binnorie
May 15, 2011, 5:11 pm
Filed under: Announcement | Tags: , , , ,

I’ve been receiving some emails from some of you who have noticed that Anagnorisis has lately been a bit quiet.  Yes…  Anagnorisis has been going through some organizational changes and it’s all happening behind the scenes.  It’s taken time away from the blogging and the exhibits, but I assure you all is very very well!

Call it a cocoon or pupal stage, if you like. For the next four months or so, I will still be blogging, working with the White Rabbit and the Brooklyn Art Project, however I will be focusing very much on the inner workings of our grotesque art project, here, hoping to emerge as … ummmm … a beautiful butterfly.  (Is this analogy cheesy enough for you?)

In the meantime, let me tease you with the art of some of the uber-talented creatives I’ve been conspiring with lately!

Yuri Leonov is a fresh graduate from the School of Visual Arts’ Illustration Department.  He started his training as an artist back in Russia when he was merely 13 years old and is looking forward to living the starving artist dream in New York City in the coming years.  His new work will be on view in September at the White Rabbit‘s White Box.

Sara Gage started sending black and white photos of herself to Lorenzo a few months ago and Lorenzo started having a blast with them.  These collaborative works are gorgeous, sexy and fun.  Cross your fingers that you’ll be able to see and collect some of these works in New York sometime soon.  Check out their website, eroticolor, here.

Ina Jang’s new exhibition, so, too & very, is currently up in the White Rabbit’s White Box.  Come by on Friday May 20th for her opening reception.  Get more info and RSVP here.



Cute & Creepy | Carrie Ann Baade Curates by Binnorie

Cute & Creepy, the upcoming group exhibition curated by Carrie Ann Baade, will be opening up soon!  Mark your calendars for this October 7th, 2011, for a trip to the Florida State Museum of Fine Arts in Tallahassee.

Featuring this, dare I say, badass lineup:

Kris Kuksi, Kathie Olivas, Jessica Joslin, Kelly Boehmer, Timothy Cummings, Thomas Woodruff, Scott G. Brooks, Elizabeth McGrath, Marion Peck, Greg “Craola” Simkins, Chris Mars, Richard A. Kirk, Laurie Hogin, Judith Schaechter, Laurie Lipton, Lori Field, Chet Zar, Christian Rex van Minnen, Ray Caesar, Martin Wittfooth, Jessica Joslin, Mark Hosford, Kate Clark and Travis Louie

A more complete website is in the works for your viewing pleasure soon!

above: Kate Clark’s Bully, 2010, Canadian White Wolf hide, clay, foam, thread, pins, rubber eyes, wood, paint, 82”×42”×54”



ART FOR JAPAN Benefit | ISE Cultural Foundation by Binnorie
March 18, 2011, 1:57 pm
Filed under: Announcement, Charity | Tags: , , , ,

As many of us are so painfully aware, on March 11 a massive earthquake of magnitude 9.0 and a huge Tsunami hit Northeast Japan causing catastrophic damage. Thousands of people were killed and many more are still missing. Even more are living in substandard temporary shelters.

This coming Tuesday March 29th from 5pm – 8pm, the ISE Cultural Foundation, where we recently exhibited Another Roadside Attraction, will be holding an affordable art sales event to benefit the Earthquake and Tsunami victims in Japan. All of the artworks will be sold either $20 or $40 in cash only.

100% of sales will be donated to the Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures through the Japanese American Association of New York.  To boot, the ISE will double this amount with their own donation. 

Edit: We raised $13,070.00 for this cause!  Thanks for all who participated!

Details
Tuesday, March 29, 2011 5:00-8:00 pm
ISE Cultural Foundation Front Space Gallery
555 Broadway, (Prince St. & Spring St.)
212.925.1649
ise@iseny.org
http://www.iseny.org

If you have any questions regarding this event, would like to donate any amount or can volunteer your time, please  contact the ISE directly.

The Japanese based ISE Cultural Foundation Gallery was established in 1984 as a non-profit organization to support mostly emerging, under-represented artists and curators by providing the opportunities of exhibition in New York City.

They have held various projects such as the “Asia Art Series” which introduced artists from many Asian countries to the US audience to help engender an international cultural exchange. Since 2002 they have focused on their “Program for Emerging Curators” (PEC) project, which gives emerging curators an opportunity to organize their exhibition in their gallery space SOHO, NY. PEC is an open call program for curators all over the world, and has had more than 30 PEC exhibitions todate. Their consistent effort to provide an experimental and alternative venue for curators and artists has been recognized by many great journals over the years such as the New York Times, New Yorker, Art in America, TimeOut NY, Village VOICE and many others.

ISE Cultural Foundation have also held public artist talks and lectures by highly established artists including Alex Katz, Mariko Mori, Jack Pierson, and Ushio Shinohara.