Anagnorisis Fine Arts


Babble Report I by Binnorie

Do to take a peek at the most recent posts Anagnorisis’s Samantha Levin has up on the Beinart Surreal Art Collective and the Creep Machine:

Or, to satiate those with a lower attention span, please visit Samantha’s sublime Tumblr blog.

Beinart:
Martin Wittfooth’s Dark Water

Dark Water contains paintings from many artists whose work frequently explores these depths, curator included.  Remarkable about the dark nature of such art, is its quality for redemption, relief or realization.  Furthermore, each of these work’s unique elements of beauty can be simultaneously stunning and soothing, offering solace for the heavy subject matter they symbolize.

Read more…

Beinart:
The Indispensable Import of the Cute & Creepy

This exhibition of sweet and sticky macabre art represents curator Carrie Ann Baade‘s efforts to act as ambassador between the contemporary grotesque and the academic environment.

Read more…

Creep Machine:
Paul Komoda // The Thing Comes to Life

The artist talks a bit about his creature concepts for the movie and his experiences working on the movie.  Exclusive peeks at the monsters he designed for the film!

Read more…

Creep Machine:
Travis Louie’s Curious Pets

A mini sneak peek into Mr. Louie’s latest solo exhibition on the west coast.  Opening this weekend!

Read more…



That Which Remains by Binnorie

What remains after all decor is stripped down to our bare bones is what makes us who we are. What happens when we are forced to see this part of ourselves?

When diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease, artist Yuri Leonov became forced to see his young life from a new perspective, and to rely upon modern technology to keep his angry immune system at bay. Through his art, Yuri explores how he feels rooted, stuck and limited by those tools that are intended to help him, and what Remains of his self: past and future.  His explorations extend out to the world at large, how our own artificial advancements remove us from what is most important, and the paradox of how our efforts are quite possibly leading to our downfall.

Yuri pulls no punches. His work and the ideas behind it are wrought with emotion: questions about life and memories of the past. His work is introspective, offered to the world en masse as possible catharsis for all of us suffering from mortality. Yuri’s is a case of illness in youth, yet he is a very strong and determined individual; honestly he looks very healthy. His work is very well thought out, intelligently emotional and meaningful. His art is not his heart on his sleeve; it is an earnest search for relief.

Taught old master technique as a boy in Russia, he has some serious old master technique chops in his arsenal, yet he is not a realist. Much of his work is abstract and his paintings which incorporate realistic figures, interiors and landscapes are often created with non-traditional mediums including bugs and his own spit. “Though the work is figurative, the initial structure is an abstract framework of composition that allows the series to be interpreted as a unified body.” Additionally he adds meaning to his painting technique (the use of unmixed white paint, for example, is used on several works in this series as a connective visual element), and each series of paintings tell a story of growth, change or realization. There are very strong concepts underlying all of his works, some of which he describes openly and some of which he has chosen to keep private.

Remain is ethereal, ghostly and, at the same time, very human.  In my mind, the concepts behind the series connect to Parke-Harrison’s Counterpoint series, and the surrealistic story-lines and imagery of some of Adrei Tarkovsky’s films.  Additional man versus technology connections can be made to Masamune Shirow‘s Ghost in the Shell.  Remain is representational of a review of the past and an uncertain future filled with metaphor, private and shared.

A personal and philosophical description of his work:

Remain, which focuses on my own shortcomings and limitations is my most intimate and personal body of work to this day. The strange conviction of self-importance is present in everyone, all of whom will undoubtedly leave this realm of existence; and so all of us attempt the best we can to avoid the inevitable constraint of time by shifting the significance of existence to the things we attempt, or pretend to know. We ignore the larger, unknown to us, scheme of things in which our whole existence is just a miniscule fragment of the general process far beyond our control, instead focusing on trying to control what we think we can.

As such, control, time and scale are the major concepts I have explored in Remain. The act of making art is an excellent example in itself: convinced by a blind ambition that this determination will somehow hold back the weight of time, and prolong my existence even if in a non physical sense. After developing and now living with serious health problems, I have also developed a solid understanding and a persistent reminder that I will die, along with everyone. What will remain?

Remain will be on view at the White Rabbit’s White Box for only a short while longer.  Some works have sold and others are still available for collection.  To view them online and for further details about his exhibit, please visit the Remain gallery here.




Anagnorisis Picks | Too Much for March by Binnorie

This is March Madness.  There’s simply too much going on this month for words – especially this week. But I’ll try. Have I mentioned it’s my birthday, too?

Andrew Wapinski | The Artist Project (Booth #307)

Andrew Wapinski | installation view of works from his Wasteland series

This week Anagnorisis will be visiting another new art fair, The Artist Project, that is taking place in conjunction with Architectural Digest’s yearly design show at Pier 92. Artist Andrew Wapinski will be exhibiting at booth #307 to promote a new series of abstract works. Shimmering and layered with acrylic, metal leaf and epoxy resin, Drew’s works are alchemical, mysterious and powerful.

Anyone interested in attending for free can contact us here. Please put “Wapinski” in the subject line of your email.

The Artist Project is taking place March 17-20 at Pier 92 (55th Street and the West Side Highway).

Bye Bye Kitty  |  Curated by David Elliott  |  Japan Society

Please attend this opening on Friday: 50% of all admission sales will go to Japan Society’s Earthquake Relief Fund.

Makoto Aida (1965– ) Harakiri School Girls (detail), 2002. Print on transparency film, holographic film, acrylic, 46 3/4 x 33 3/8 in.

The Japan Society’s “Debutante”, Kristen Sollee, has been telling me about this wonderful show for months now, as it brings some amazing Japanese artists to the states who are virtually unknown to us jaded New Yorkers. This exhibition will show us a Japan that we are not often exposed to out here.

Curated by David Elliott, founding Director of the Mori Art Museum, Bye Bye Kitty!!! is a radical departure from recent Japanese exhibitions. Moving far beyond the stereotypes of kawaii and otaku culture, Japan Society’s show features sixteen emerging and mid-career artists whose paintings, objects, photographs, videos, and installations meld traditional styles with challenging visions of Japan’s troubled present and uncertain future. Each of the three sections, “Critical Memory,” “Threatened Nature,” and “Unquiet Dream,” not only offers a feast for the senses but also demolishes our preconceptions about contemporary Japan and its art.

The sixteen featured artists are: Makoto Aida会田誠; Manabu Ikeda池田学; Tomoko Kashiki樫木知子; Rinko Kawauchi川内倫子; Haruka Kojin荒神明香; Kumi Machida町田久美; Yoshitomo Nara奈良美智; Kohei Nawa名和晃平; Motohiko Odani小谷元彦; Hiraki Sawaさわひらき; Chiharu Shiota塩田千春; Tomoko Shioyasu塩保朋子; Hisashi Tenmyouya天明屋尚; Yamaguchi Akira山口晃; Miwa Yanagiやなぎみわ; Tomoko Yoneda米田知子.

In conjunction with Carnegie Hall’s JapanNYC festival.

I’m getting a nice sneak peek, but do stop by this Friday for the opening night. The JS is located at 333 East 47th Street.  Bye Bye Kitty!!! will be on view until June 12th.

Tiny Trifecta  |  Tara McPherson and Friends  |  Cotton Candy Machine

How sweet!!  Tara McPherson is embarking on this wonderful new journey with the Cotton Candy Machine, a new store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.  For the opening night celebration, Tara has brought in a bazillion artists to sell work from the newly painted walls.

Please join Paul Romano, Jeremy Hush and a bazillion other heavy hitting artists at the opening night (which will most definitely be huge) on April 9th, 7pm – 12am.  CC is located at 235 South First Street right off the L train Bedford stop.

Single Fare: Please Swipe Again  |  Sloan Fine Art

Jeff Faerber | oil on recycled metro card

I absolutely love these shows of small works of art using recycled materials not only because they’re fun, but because they’re often done for some charitable cause.  A portion of the proceeds from this particular exhibition will benefit Transportation Alternatives and Alliance for the Arts‘ NYC ARTS.  Transportation Alternatives‘ mission is to reclaim New York City’s streets from the automobile, and to advocate for bicycling, walking and public transit as the best transportation alternatives.  The Alliance for the Arts serves the entire cultural community through research and advocacy and serves the public through cultural guides and calendars. Through its NYC ARTS guides and calendars, the Alliance promotes New York cultural institutions. Through its research studies highlighting the importance of the arts to the economy and to education, the Alliance helps government and civic leaders understand the importance of cultural organizations to New York City. More information on the Alliance’s work can be found at the new http://www.AllianceforArts.org.

Works in these sorts of shows are also often affordable and offer wonderful surprises – small works often allow artists to work quick and spontaneously.  Anagnorisis artist Jeff Faerber will have a bunch of works in the mix!

For more information, check out the press release here.

This Show of Small Works on Used MetroCards opens on Thursday, March 17th, 5 to 9 pm and will be on view from March 18 to 26, 2011.

Sloan Fine Art is located at 128 Rivington Street.



Paul Romano by Binnorie
March 4, 2011, 5:19 pm
Filed under: Prints | Tags: , , , , ,

Paul Romano, renowned for his work he’s done for the heavy metal music scene, most famously Mastodon, is currently taking part in the Verge Brooklyn Art Fair with us and the Brooklyn Art Project. He has created a new 6 color screen print, The Visitation (shown above), for this event which will be on sale throughout the weekend. To purchase,  please email us.



Anagnorisis Picks | February by Binnorie

Yikes – it’s almost February.  What happened to the first month of 2011?!  Lots of snow and cold is what happened.   Please don’t hide away in your homes during this weather – come out to see art!

Besides our own opening reception for James Moore’s Rebirth Control on Friday, February 4th at the White Rabbit, there are a couple notable shows you should most definitely attend.  I’ve already recently posted about Bill Viola at the newly renovated Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, and the closing party in Philly this Saturday with artists Jeremy Hush, Paul Romano and Mike Wohlberg at Masthead Gallery, but you also shouldn’t miss these two:

Robin Williams | Rescue Party | P.P.O.W.

Cabbage Patch  |  2010, oil on linen, 44 x 72 inches

I love the dreamy quality of Robin Williams’ works.  His paintings remind me that I should relax: summer will eventually return.

This exhibit will be up from January 27 – February 26, with a reception on February 3, 6-8pm.  P.P.O.W. has apparently moved again (?) and is now located at 535 West 22nd Street, 3rd floor.

Ray Caesar  |  A Gentle Kind of Cruelty |  Jonathan Levine

Calamity | digital media on panel (UltraChrome print on Epson Luster paper, mounted on Dibond) 40 x 60 inches

If you missed the opening, you can still catch this exhibition of Caesar’s work which will be on view until February 19th.  Caesar’s use of lighting and color, mixed with a Rococo spirit, are a feast for the eyes.  Almost belying that spirit is the digital medium Caesar employs to explore reoccurring themes of, “fantasy, escapism, human cruelty and disguise…”

Jonathan Levine Gallery is located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th floor.